30 Day Challenge Day 24!

Day 24

Write a story about a victimizer and a victim… in which the person who appears

to be the victim is really the victimizer, and the person who appears to be the

victimizer is actually the other person’s victim…

Confession time. I was drawing a complete blank for this one.  When I first saw the prompt last night I thought it was going to be great, something dark and right up my alley. I was WRONG.  I had NOTHING. NADA, Zip. ZILCH. ZERO.  My poor head was emptier than a super model’s stomach.  Luckily a friend made a truly absurd suggestion that turned out to be what I needed to get going. 🙂

“You poor thing,” Janelle crooned, handing Craig a French fry off her plate. “I don’t know how you put up with it, that are so cruel to you.”

“I do what I have to, baby.” Craig gave her a long suffering sigh and a look a basset hound puppy would be hard pressed to match. “Not everyone can have a great job, but I can’t afford to quit.” She gave him a kiss on the cheek.

“How about we get you home and I give you a foot rub and a beer?” Janelle spent many evening like that, seated firmly on the floor while he propped his feet in her lap and watched the television and drank beer. His boss was such a jerk, working him so hard all time. She hardly ever got to see him when he wasn’t worn out completely.

****************************************

“Where’s Craig?” Evan looked over the cubicle wall. He hadn’t seen Craig in days, but his computer was on.

“Hey, have any of you seen Craig?” He raised his voice enough that the occupied cubicles in the immediate vicinity could hear.

“I think he is in a meeting with marketing,” a voice from his right said.

“Marketing?” Another questioned. “I thought it was strategic planning.”

“That was yesterday,” the first voice said, or the day before. “Maybe it was R&D today. He’s always in a meeting.”

“When is the last time any of you even saw him?” Evan asked. None of the things these guys were talking about had anything to do with Craig’s job. Craig’s job was to sit at his desk and enter the information Evan sent to him into the data base.

“I heard him over there a few hours ago,” voice number two confirmed. “He gets in really early and stays really late, he does most of his computer work when we are all gone because he has too many meetings.”

“Are you sure we are talking about the same guy?” Evan asked. This was absurd. Craig had not responded to a single email of voice mail in over a week and the work was piling up. Did this guy work at all?

~Heather

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5 comments

  1. nyankoto · September 17, 2014

    Wow. I’d like to figure out how to get away with that, too. What a sweet deal. Suckers!

    • asylumfarm · September 18, 2014

      I work with one almost that bad and it never ceases to amaze me what he can get away with. I was hoping this was not a fudge on the intent of the prompt.

      • nyankoto · September 18, 2014

        I think that creatively interpreting a prompt is actually a good sign.

        In one of my previous jobs, I had a co-worker who was really good at talking like a professional team player but actually did her work. The people around her knew about it (because they dealt with the resulting messes), but the bosses seemed clueless — they only saw her big talk. But it caught up with her eventually…

        Actually, I think that garden-variety sociopaths are also good at pulling off that kind of thing. They are great at playing on people’s sympathy and pulling one over on folks. There was a great book on that a few years ago. I think it was called “The Sociopath Next Door”.

      • asylumfarm · September 19, 2014

        I read that book! It is one of the most terrifying things I’ve ever read. Like the woman that had her puppy euthanized because it was a hassle, but told everyone it was sick and died. That book made me realize how easy it is for someone like that to manipulate everyone. Normal people just don’t think like that.

      • nyankoto · September 19, 2014

        Oops — “never did her work,” is what I meant. Sigh.

        Yeah. I think she overestimated the percentage of the population that’s sociopathic, but it was till an impressive and sobering book. The idea that because we would never lie like that leaves us vulnerable to people who do… Creepy. And fascinating!

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